Hearing Loss Is Treatable

Let the experts at Audiology Associates help you get back to hearing life in high definition.

Hearing Testing

A basic hearing test, done in office with a licensed hearing care professional. 

Hearing Aid Fitting

One-on-one appointments to fit, test, and get comfortable with your new hearing aids. 

Hearing Rehabilitation

Your treatment plan is developed to include counseling and training to help your brain and ears work in unison with your hearing aid. 

Understanding How Your Hearing Works

Your auditory system has many parts all working in unison allowing you to hear. For this reason it is important to understand how hearing works in order to make sense of what may be affecting your hearing and what treatment options are available to you. Hearing begins at your ear, which is made up of three main parts:

The outer ear, consist of the visible parts of your ear called the pinna, the ear canal and the eardrum. Sound waves are collected by the pinna and channeled through the ear canal to the eardrum. 

The middle ear is made up of three small bones; the malleus, the incus and the stapes which sit in an air-filled pocket connecting the inner ear and the eardrum. All of these parts work to send the vibration of the sound waves from your outer ear through to your inner ear. This portion of your ear also connects to the throat by the Eustachian tube which stabilizes the air pressure surrounding your eardrum. 

The inner ear is where our ears and brain communicate. This part of the ear contains the cochlea; a snail shaped bone containing fluid and “hair cells” that process the vibration of the sound waves. When vibrations enter the cochlea they create movement in the hair cells which send electrical signals to the brain through the hearing nerve. The brain interprets these signals allowing us to hear. 

 

Hear the Moments that Matter

Rehabilitative Services

When the audiologist determines that a patient has a non-medical problem with their hearing, hearing aids may be recommended. Like all electronics, hearing aids are “not what they used to be”. Many manufacturers produce devices that utilize computer capabilities to enhance the processing of speech, making soft sounds audible and loud sounds comfortable. No adjustment to volume needs to be made by the patient. In addition, many patients using this advanced technology report much better understanding of speech in the presence of noise. This means improved hearing and understanding in noisy restaurants. In order to “prove” these enhancements in hearing, patients are provided with a minimum of a two month trial period with amplification to allow them to experience the difference. Improved communication skills lead to a better and more complete lifestyle. In this day and age of technology, no patient with a hearing problem should experience life in a confused “sound” world.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is an Audiologist?

An AUDIOLOGIST is a professional who specializes in diagnosing and treating hearing loss and balance disorders.  Audiologists have extensive training and skills to evaluate the hearing of adults, infants and children of all ages.  Audiologists conduct a wide variety of procedures to determine the exact nature of an individual’s hearing or balance problems. On the basis of the patient’s medical history and the results of the audiologist’s evaluation, a diagnosis is provided and a treatment plan is recommended.  Audiologists dispense and fit hearing aids, administer procedures of balance to evaluate dizziness and provide hearing and vestibular rehabilitation. Audiologists refer patients to physicians when a hearing problem or balance problem requires medical or surgical treatment.

Why should I see an Audiologist?

Audiologists hold a Doctor of Audiology degree (Au.D.)  from accredited universities with special training in the diagnosis, prevention and non-medical treatment of hearing and balance disorders. Audiologists are required to complete a full-time internship and pass a demanding national competency examination. By virtue of their graduate education and state licensure, audiologists are the most qualified professionals to treat and manage hearing or balance problems.

What should I do if I feel that I have a hearing problem?

If you feel like you may have a hearing problem you should receive a comprehensive audiological evaluation. Contact our main clinical office to schedule an appointment at 410-944-3100.  If you live within the Baltimore area, then you can find a local audiologist by clicking here.  If you live outside the Baltimore Area, then you can find a local audiologist by clicking here for the American Academy of Audiology  or here for the Academy of Doctors of Audiology.

Do you take insurance?

As the largest and oldest private audiology practice in Maryland, we work with most major providers and are constantly adding new carriers.  If you don’t find your carrier below, please call us at 410-944-3100 or send an email to inquire.

  • AETNA
  • AMERIGROUP AMERIVANTAGE
  • CAREFIRST BLUE CHOICE
  • CAREFIRST BC/BS (PPN,PPO & POS)
  • CARE IMPROVEMENT PLUS
  • CIGNA HEALTH CARE
  • COVENTRY HEALTH CARE
  • FEDERAL BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD
  • GREAT WEST INSURANCE
  • JOHN HOPKINS MEDICAL SERVICES
  • JOHN HOPKINS EMPLOYEE HEALTH PROGRAM
  • MAMSI LIFE AND HEALTH
  • MDIPA
  • MEDICAL ASSISTANCE
  • MEDICARE
  • NCAS
  • OPTIMUM CHOICE
  • RAILROAD MEDICARE
  • TRICARE
  • UNITED HEALTHCARE

NOTE:  All MCO Plans can be referred to us for members under the age of 21. Audiology Services are billed to Medical Assistance for these members.

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Maryland's First Audiology Practice

Phone: (410) 944-3100

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